yob

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YOB

abbr.
year of birth

yob

 (yŏb)
n. Chiefly British Slang
A rowdy, aggressive, or violent young man.

[Alteration of boy (spelled backward).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

yob

(jɒb) or

yobbo

n, pl yobs or yobbos
(Sociology) slang Brit an aggressive and surly youth, esp a teenager
[C19: perhaps back slang for boy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

yob

(yɒb)

n. Brit. Slang.
a teenage lout or hooligan.
[1855–60; a consciously reversed form of boy]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yob - a cruel and brutal fellowyob - a cruel and brutal fellow    
aggressor, assailant, assaulter, attacker - someone who attacks
bullyboy - a swaggering tough; usually one acting as an agent of a political faction
muscleman, muscle - a bully employed as a thug or bodyguard; "the drug lord had his muscleman to protect him"
skinhead - a young person who belongs to a British or American group that shave their heads and gather at rock concerts or engage in white supremacist demonstrations
plug-ugly, tough guy - someone who bullies weaker people
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

yob

yobbo
noun thug, hooligan, lout, heavy (slang), tough, rough (informal), rowdy, yahoo, hoon (Austral. & N.Z. slang), hoodlum, ruffian, roughneck (slang), boot boy, tsotsi (S. African) Violent and dangerous yobs deserve to be locked up.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

yob

[ˈjɒb] yobbo [ˈjɒbəʊ] N (Brit) → vándalo m, gamberro m (Sp)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

yob

[ˈjɒb] n (British)loubard m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

yob

n (Brit inf) → Halbstarke(r) m, → Rowdy m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

yob

[ˈjɒb] yobbo [ˈjɒbəʊ] n (Brit) (fam) → teppista m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
(9,6) 34.Do not admit some sudden yobbishness (4) 35.I won't move east to find urban dweller (6) DOWN 2.
Three-quarters of the teachers said parents who do not set and enforce rules at home were responsible for yobbishness in class, the Daily Express reported.
MERSEYRAIL reported a "significant drop" in booze-fuelled yobbishness on its network.
I, LIKE many decent people am totally shocked at recent scenes of wanton vandalism, violence and just plain yobbishness on our streets by cowards with hate in their eyes.
It is the yobbishness which gave football a bad name 20 years ago and will do the same for public transport.
Nobody would disagree with her verdict that they have not been a "silver bullet" capable of controlling yobbishness and families from hell.
We are scum when it comes to abusing other people's countries with unbridled yobbishness. Go to any British town centre on a weekend and stand witness to the goings-on of the drunken scum who fight, use foul language, vomit and urinate in the street; male and female, it makes no difference.
In a major speech to a think tank in central London, he was to draw a link between minor yobbishness and the ''brutality'' of more serious violence.
Before anyone retorts that Tunbridge Wells is full of old fogies, may I add that there is vibrant nightlife and a party atmosphere, but there is not the drunken yobbishness seen elsewhere.
Only last month Northumbria Chief Constable Mike Craik urged adults to "challenge" young people who misbehave - and hoped for a return to the era when he grew up of adults being confident enough to confront yobbishness.