yonic


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Related to yonic: Yonic symbol

yonic

(ˈjəʊnɪk)
adj
(Hinduism) Hinduism of or relating to a yoni
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
A 1916 sketch for a Vogue cover features the same yonic arcs and swoops of her paintings, recombined to create the volume and motion of a colorful coat, with exuberance to spare.--ANNA ALTMAN
This is not to say that black holes, or yonic symbology broadly speaking, carry the same affective potential, or the same set of cognitive associations, for every person, or even within each theoretical framework.
Differential teratogenic effect of alcohol on embr yonic development between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice: a new view.
It is important to note the contaminating power of the abject, in order to make the argument that Kate bears her femininity as both self-identification and what David Halperin calls "an extreme form of disidentification"--a struggle that marks Kate's development throughout the novel: to identify with either the phallic (on the assumption that masculinity is a priori the norm) or the yonic (68).
Others -- such as a large red door held firmly closed with nine silver locks, surrounded by a fine ring of sand -- are yonic abstractions.
This is the first poetry collection for Wila member Charmaine Carreon, who won second prize for English Poetry in the 2012 Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature for her poems in "The Yonic Lover." The winning poems are part of the "Travelbook."
The flower's beauty that is "its own excuse for being" provides delight: the bloom is "To please the desert," to serve as a "charm," to make the water "gay," and to create--in blatantly sexual, both phallic and yonic imagery--in a "damp nook," a place where "might the red-bird come his plumes to cool" as he seeks to "court" this flower that, in a sort of poetic love triangle, is "the rival of the rose." For while sometimes nature can appear as a threatening female force in Emerson's poetry (as, for example, in "The Sphinx"), when the poet is empowered, he is made so by becoming the lover of nature and yielding himself to her.
(5) Curtin adds that "armed filial devotion to the mother-nation" was "a rite of passage to full manhood." (6) If colonialism endangers Irish masculinity, then it is not surprising that this fear of emasculation or castration generates multiple projections, including those of yonic teeth.
The yonic imagery of the vials and the outpouring liquid certainly signals that adult sexuality is one of the arenas of anxiety in the poem.