younger


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young

 (yŭng)
adj. young·er, young·est
1. Being in an early period of life, development, or growth.
2. Newly begun or formed; not advanced: a young biotech company.
3. Relating to, typical of, or suggestive of youth or early life: He is young for his age.
4. Lacking experience; immature: a young hand at plowing.
5. Being the junior of two people having the same name.
6. Geology Being of an early stage in a geologic cycle. Used of bodies of water and land formations.
n.
1. Young persons considered as a group; youth: entertainment for the young.
2. Offspring; brood: a lioness with her young.
Idiom:
with young
Pregnant. Used of an animal.

[Middle English yong, from Old English geong; see yeu- in Indo-European roots.]

young′ness n.
Synonyms: young, youthful, adolescent, immature, juvenile, childish, puerile, infantile
These adjectives relate to an early stage of growth or development and to its accompanying characteristics. Young is the most general, applying to various periods of life, generally before middle age, as well as to inanimate entities: a young child; a young couple; a young galaxy.
It can suggest a youthful attitude or outlook regardless of chronological age: young at heart.
Youthful suggests the positive characteristics, such as enthusiasm, freshness, or energy, that are traditionally associated with youth: approached the task with youthful ardor.
Adolescent connotes the physical and especially mental or emotional characteristics of those between childhood and maturity; it is generally not disparaging except when used of an adult: adolescent insecurity; an adolescent outburst from the trial lawyer.
Immature is more clearly judgmental, implying that someone falls short of an expected level of mental or emotional development for his or her age: an emotionally immature adult.
Juvenile suggests the immaturity usually associated with adolescents, but it can convey an attitude of tolerance as well as criticism: the juvenile pranks of the conventioneers.
Childish is similar to juvenile but with a younger frame of reference, often suggesting selfishness, stubbornness, or lack of restraint: a committee member with a childish need to have the last word.
However, it can also suggest such positive qualities of children as innocence and wholeheartedness: took childish delight in tending his garden.
Puerile and infantile are used derogatorily to suggest extreme immaturity, especially with regard to social manners: a puerile joke; an infantile boast.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.younger - used of the younger of two persons of the same name especially used to distinguish a son from his fatheryounger - used of the younger of two persons of the same name especially used to distinguish a son from his father; "John Junior"; "John Smith, Jr."
junior - younger; lower in rank; shorter in length of tenure or service
Translations
mladší
yngre
nuorempi
mlađi
年下の方の
더 어린
yngre
มีอายุน้อยกว่า
trẻ hơn

younger

أَصْغَر mladší yngre jünger νεότερος más joven nuorempi plus jeune mlađi più giovane 年下の方の 더 어린 jonger yngre młodszy mais jovem более молодой yngre มีอายุน้อยกว่า daha genç trẻ hơn 较年轻的

younger

(comp of young) adj más joven, menor; — brother hermano menor
References in classic literature ?
The elder woman, ashamed to be courted by a man younger than herself, made a point, whenever her admirer visited her, to pull out some portion of his black hairs.
She asked her, at different times, how many sisters she had, whether they were older or younger than herself, whether any of them were likely to be married, whether they were handsome, where they had been educated, what carriage her father kept, and what had been her mother's maiden name?
There are then three parts of domestic government, the masters, of which we have already treated, the fathers, and the husbands; now the government of the wife and children should both be that of free persons, but not the [I259b] same; for the wife should be treated as a citizen of a free state, the children should be under kingly power; for the male is by nature superior to the female, except when something happens contrary to the usual course of nature, as is the elder and perfect to the younger and imperfect.
Why, she's hungry, poor little lady," said the younger woman.
As often happens in these large families, a distinct dividing-line could be traced, about half-way in the succession, where the money for educational purposes had run short, and the six younger children had grown up far more economically than the elder.
The majority of the younger men envied him for just what was the most irksome factor in his love--the exalted position of Karenin, and the consequent publicity of their connection in society.
Nothing would do but that the ape-man should occupy the best hut in the village, from which M'ganwazam's oldest wife was forthwith summarily ejected, while the chief took up his temporary abode in the hut of one of his younger consorts.
One moment I was a wee babe of the Younger World lying in my tree nest; the next moment I was a grown man of the Younger World locked in combat with the hideous Red-Eye; and the next moment I was creeping carefully down to the water-hole in the heat of the day.
Meanwhile the younger generation: Boris, the officer, Anna Mikhaylovna's son; Nicholas, the undergraduate, the count's eldest son; Sonya, the count's fifteen-year-old niece, and little Petya, his youngest boy, had all settled down in the drawing room and were obviously trying to restrain within the bounds of decorum the excitement and mirth that shone in all their faces.
Some day it may seem worth while to take up the story of the younger ones again and see what sort of men and women they turned out to be; therefore it will be wisest not to reveal any of that part of their lives at present.
So when the Old Man was dead each of the youths put a weed upon his hat and wore it until he was himself old, when, seeing that neither would give in, they agreed that the younger should leave off his weeds and the elder give him half of the estate.
In about ten minutes he returned, followed by three ladies; one tall, pale lady, wrapped in a white shawl, leaned on a younger lady, with dark eyes and a merry face; the other, a very stately-looking person, was Miss Blomefield.