yuck


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yuck 1

also yuk  (yŭk)
interj. Slang
Used to express rejection or strong disgust.

yuck 2

 (yŭk) Informal
n. & v.
Variant of yuk1.

yuck

(jʌk) or

yuk

interj
slang an exclamation indicating contempt, dislike, or disgust

yuck1

(yʌk)

interj. Slang.
(used as an expression of disgust or repugnance.)
[1965–70, Amer.; expressive word]

yuck2

(yʌk)

n., v.i., v.t. yucked, yuck•ing. Slang.
Translations
fuj
yök
pfuj
fuj
bläfyusch

yuck

[jʌk] EXCL¡puaj!
References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Winstanley, of NHSBT's Tissue and Eye Services, told the Press Association: "It is a phenomenon which we call the 'yuck factor' - some people are squeamish about eyes.
When Empoy was asked if Alessandra is his type, Empoy said: "Yuck!"
In the end of her description she wrote "yuck" with a hashtag.
The yuck factor comes from mixing what's likely to be a surprising volume of food scraps and keeping them at room temperature for up to two weeks.
PYJAMAS YUCK The average 18 to 30-year-old man wears the same pyjamas for 13 nights and young women 17 nights before washing them, according to a recent survey.
"I am a fairly respected writer," said the author, whose credits include Oh Yuck! The Encyclopedia of Everything Nasty and Oh Yikes!
With surprisingly resilient bristles and a sugar-free, liquid-filled "freshening bead," the Wisp gives you a just-brushed feeling in peppermint, spearmint or cinnamon and is designed to ferret out yuck from all corners.
Yuck! I want her to worry less about "down there" and be more of a listener.
My first thought was "Yuck!" but I tried it with hot and with iced coffee and actually liked it with both.
Yuck! A Foldout Book of People Sounds, Newbery Award-winning author Linda Sue Park and co-writer Julia Durango explore the sounds people make in different languages.
He is survived by his wife, Helen; sons, Evan, Bruce and Randy; daughter-in-law, Judy; sister, Yuck Har and brother-in-law, Nam.
(Plus, on general principle, yuck!) Microbiologic culture and polymerase chain reaction were used to determine carriage rates among dogs and their humans in a study reported in Emerging Infectious Diseases.