zenith

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Related to zeniths: nadir

ze·nith

 (zē′nĭth)
n.
1. The point on the celestial sphere that is directly above the observer.
2. The upper region of the sky.
3. The highest point above the observer's horizon attained by a celestial body.
4. The point of culmination; the peak: the zenith of her career. See Synonyms at summit.

[Middle English senith, from Old French cenith, from Medieval Latin, from Arabic samt (ar-ra's), path (over the head), from Latin sēmita, path; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

zenith

(ˈzɛnɪθ; US ˈziːnɪθ)
n
1. (Astronomy) astronomy the point on the celestial sphere vertically above an observer
2. the highest point; peak; acme: the zenith of someone's achievements.
[C17: from French cenith, from Medieval Latin, from Old Spanish zenit, based on Arabic samt, as in samt arrās path over one's head, from samt way, path + al the + rās head]
ˈzenithal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ze•nith

(ˈzi nɪθ; esp. Brit. ˈzɛn ɪθ)

n.
1. the point on the celestial sphere vertically above a given position or observer. Compare nadir.
2. the highest point or state; culmination; peak.
[1350–1400; Middle English cenith < Medieval Latin < Old Spanish zenit, scribal error for zemt < Arabic samt road (compare Arabic samt ar-rās road above (over) one's head, the opposite of nadir)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ze·nith

(zē′nĭth)
The point on the celestial sphere that is directly above the observer.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

zenith

, nadir - Zenith derived from Arabic samt ar-ras, "the way or road above one's head"; zenith technically is the point directly above the observer and nadir is the point directly below.
See also related terms for observer.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.zenith - the point above the observer that is directly opposite the nadir on the imaginary sphere against which celestial bodies appear to be projected
celestial point - a point in the heavens (on the celestial sphere)
celestial sphere, empyrean, firmament, heavens, vault of heaven, welkin, sphere - the apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projected
nadir - the point below the observer that is directly opposite the zenith on the imaginary sphere against which celestial bodies appear to be projected
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

zenith

noun height, summit, peak, top, climax, crest, high point, pinnacle, meridian, apex, high noon, apogee, acme, vertex His career is now at its zenith.
base, bottom, nadir, lowest point, depths, rock bottom
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

zenith

noun
The highest point or state:
Informal: payoff.
Medicine: fastigium.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سَمْت، أوْج، أعْلى نُقْطَه
zenitnadhlavník
topzenit
lakipistezeniitti
zenit
hvirfilpunktur, hápunktur
天頂絶頂頂点
zenitas
zenīts
zenit
zenitzirve

zenith

[ˈzenɪθ] N
1. (Astron) → cenit m
2. (fig) → cenit m, apogeo m
to be at the zenith of one's powerestar en el apogeo de su poder
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

zenith

[ˈzɛnɪθ ˈziːnɪθ] n
(ASTRONOMY)zénith m
to reach its zenith [sun, planet] → atteindre son zénith
(fig)zénith m
to be at its zenith → être à son zénith
to reach its zenith → atteindre son zénith
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

zenith

n (Astron, fig) → Zenit m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

zenith

[ˈzɛnɪθ] n (liter) (of civilization) → culmine m; (of career) → apice m (Astron) → zenit m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

zenith

(ˈzeniθ) noun
the highest point. The sun reaches its zenith at midday.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
-- After what has been said above, it will be necessary, first of all, to choose the period when the moon will be in perigee, and also the moment when she will be crossing the zenith, which latter event will further diminish the entire distance by a length equal to the radius of the earth, i.
An unwearied pall of cloud muffled the whole expanse of sky from zenith to horizon.
A heavy report recalled Bert's eyes to the zenith, and behold, the great crescent had lost its dressing and burst into a disorderly long cloud of airships!
When Mr Balfour replied to the allegations that the Roman Empire sank under the weight of its military obligations, he said that this was 'wholly unhistorical.' He might well have added that the Roman power was at its zenith when every citizen acknowledged his liability to fight for the State, but that it began to decline as soon as this obligation was no longer recognized."--Pall Mall Gazette, 15th May 1906.
It was the time when the youthful Speranski was at the zenith of his fame and his reforms were being pushed forward with the greatest energy.
And at the zenith of his fame, how he would suddenly appear at the old village and stalk into church, brown and weather-beaten, in his black velvet doublet and trunks, his great jack-boots, his crimson sash, his belt bristling with horse-pistols, his crime-rusted cut- lass at his side, his slouch hat with waving plumes, his black flag unfurled, with the skull and crossbones on it, and hear with swelling ecstasy the whisperings, "It's Tom Sawyer the Pirate!