zine

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Related to Zines: sleep paralysis, e-zines

zine

also 'zine  (zēn)
n.
1. An inexpensively produced, self-published, underground publication: I often contributed cartoons and essays to other people's 'zines, so why didn't I just buckle down and start my own? (Pagan Kennedy).
2. An e-zine.

[Short for magazine.]

zine

(ziːn)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) informal a magazine or fanzine

'zine

or zine

(zin)
n.
1. an individualistic, small-circulation magazine typically produced cheaply by a single nonprofessional enthusiast.
2. such a magazine existing on the World Wide Web.
[1960–65; clipping of fanzine]
Translations

zine

[ziːn] 'zine Nfanzine m, revistilla f

zine

[ˈziːn] nzine m

zine

, ’zine (inf)
n kleine, amateurhaft produzierte Zeitschrift, → Magazin nt, → Heftchen nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Winston Zhang, CEO of FlipHTML5, said, "We are excited to help users create digital zines to express their ideas through text, images, and videos.
Zines are a versatile, low-cost addition to any library that serves a teen population.
Zines are messy; they're hard to define and they make things feel a little bit uncomfortable.
If you have the flexibility to consider maker projects beyond STEM kits, are eager to amplify diverse voices, or simply want to broaden the range of activities available to makers, zines may be for you.
Zines, like all texts, are created for specific purposes.
Zines, which show a full spectrum of highbrow and lowbrow printing methods, are self-published material that are handmade, then photocopied.
Zines have their roots in small press and fan magazines communities in the 1950s and 1960s and are self-published periodicals covering a wide variety of subjects, including, those dedicated to punk and musical styles, poetry and literature, religion, science fiction, fantasy, ecology, politics, feminism, sports, among others.
Garvey's inclusion of a wider and deeper range of literary precursors for zines, though debatable, underscores Michelle Comstock's sensible focus on the little and fan magazine communities of the 1950's and 1960's--associated as they are with the Beat movement and the underground, countercultural press--as the nearest sources for the origins of zines such as Maximum-RocknRoll, riot grrrl, Cometbus, Ben Is Dead, and Rant.
This is evidenced through the popularity of literary and poetry zines at national Zinefests throughout the country and abroad.
The book begins with an overview of Eichhorn's analyses and theoretical orientations and then moves into three case studies, each focused on a collection: the zines at the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History & Culture, in the David M.
There will also be a DEAR time (Drop Everything And Read) section, and a zine wall for zine makers who were unable to register in time for a place to showcase their zines at the fair.