zip gun


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zip gun

n. Slang
A crude homemade pistol.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

zip gun

n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) slang US and Canadian a crude homemade pistol, esp one powered by a spring or rubber band
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

zip′ gun`


n.
a homemade pistol, typically consisting of a metal tube taped to a wooden stock and firing a.22-caliber bullet.
[1945–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.zip gun - a crude homemade pistolzip gun - a crude homemade pistol    
handgun, pistol, shooting iron, side arm - a firearm that is held and fired with one hand
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another critic wrote, "Yet on the last interview the reporter reported your home was full of guns and you posted a YouTube video on how to make a [expletive] zip gun! Are you on drugs?"
For homemade firearm, as well as for blank pistol, tear gas gun or cap pistol that are adapted to use as firearm, there is a commonly used term - "zip gun"[1, 2].
Their wonderful single actions were now history and, as said, the company was making a really silly .22 with the unfortunate name of "Zip Gun."
A few of note: Aiko's "Spring Break," a CD cover-like layered composition of black stencil and pink spray paint featuring a foreground femme and background movie-magazine embrace; Bast's "Sweet Hooligan," a doctored butchershop pseudosign crowing "Perdue Chicken Thugs" and a handgun-waving cartoon duck, fails the lights-on-and-anyone's-at-home test, like so much other vacant street art (Bast's dearer, "Pea Shooter" zip gun is a criminally seductive objet de la mort); Judith Supine's "Million Man March," three Newport cigarette package assemblages, are Basquiat-brilliant; Spam's "Time is for the Birds, Grandpa" and Joe Roberts's "B4 The internet" are Cornell-esque; and "For Fear of Four Tears" by Andrew Poneros (Pork) and "Look into my, in ...