zoomorphic


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zo·o·mor·phism

 (zō′ə-môr′fĭz′əm)
n.
1. Attribution of animal characteristics or qualities to a god.
2. Use of animal forms in symbolism, literature, or graphic representation.

zo′o·mor′phic adj.

zo•o•mor•phic

(ˌzoʊ əˈmɔr fɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a deity or other being conceived of as having the form of an animal.
2. characterized by a highly stylized or conventionalized representation of animal forms.
3. representing or using animal forms.
[1870–75]
Translations
zoomorphezoomorphique

zoomorphic

[ˌzəʊəʊˈmɒːfɪk] ADJzoomórfico

zoomorphic

adjzoomorph
References in periodicals archive ?
Substantial numbers of anthropomorphic and zoomorphic sculptures, mainly in terracotta but also in brass, were produced in the region between the 11th and 15th centuries.
And there are even those who entertain us with zoomorphic calligraphy, displaying peacocks and other works of nature.
The gold zoomorphic mount depicts two eagles holding a fish, and may have been used as decoration on a shield
Reeves also brings a kneeling ancestor figure from the Sepik region in Papua New Guinea, with human limbs and torso crowned by a long-snouted, zoomorphic head on top of which is balanced a gourd.
Design motifs often represented medicines that empowered or protected the wearer, either in the form of botanicals or zoomorphic symbology of clan totems.
For instance, if the politician's face with any animal's body is depicted in a political cartoon, it would be a zoomorphic metaphor that builds the image of that politician with reference to the particular animal and its characteristics.
Detailed instructions, complete with sample alphabets, lead you through the essentials of classic styles such as Gothic and Italic lettering, on to vintage- inspired sign writing and chalkboard design and even into the elegant, image-led worlds of illuminated capitals and zoomorphic calligraphy.
The film shows fish, humans, and fish-like humanoids commingling in a "zoomorphic space--a space inhabited by more-than-human lives" (Pick 311).
Quite often in the works of the 1920s Latvian characters are endowed with repulsive, zoomorphic qualities, such as, for instance in I.
Phytomorphic and zoomorphic initials, capitals and rubrics in red ink; no filigree designs; cadels in black ink; brown leather over boards.