zoopraxiscope


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zoopraxiscope

an early form of motion-picture projector.
See also: Films
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Bien qu'ils aient prepare leur developpement, le zoopraxiscope de Muybridge (1872-1885) ou le chronophotographe de Marey (1882) auxquels Bergson songe, ne ressemblent pas au cinematographe des freres Lumiere ou au cinema que nous connaissons actuellement.
In the late nineteenth century there was a flurry of devices and a parade of names, which all contributed more or less, depending on one's perspective, to the development of cinematic culture in forms that we might recognise today: praxinoscope, zoopraxiscope, chronophotographs, biofantascope, kinetograph, kinetophonograph, Reynaud, Muybridge, Marey, Friese-Green, Edison, to cite just a handful.
In 1879 Muybridge invented the zoopraxiscope to show these photographs in a rapid sequence which created the illusion of a moving racehorse.
Muybridge's technical savvy captured the moment--and was, in a way, the advent of moving pictures, his "zoopraxiscope" a progenitor of the first film projectors.
On the way to his zoopraxiscope, Muybridge invented a stereo-zoetrope in order to animate the double images captured by the stereo cameras he used in early motion studies.
This three-volume set of of encyclopedias, the coordinated work of 150 contributors, covers American movie history from the invention of the zoopraxiscope to present day, giving attention to how movies interface with social issues including issues of race and gender.
Photographic experiments, like those of Eadweard Muybridge, and new technological gizmos, like the zoopraxiscope, encouraged people to see photographs as single moments sliced out of a continuous timeline.
For his invention in 1879 of the zoopraxiscope, a device containing a turning glass disc for projecting "moving" pictures, he is considered one of the fathers of cinema.
Muybridge's career and extensive pioneering work is examined in themes such as The Geology of Time: Yosemite and the High Sierra; War, Murder, and the Production of Coffee: the Modoc Wars and the Development of Central America; Motion Pictures: the Zoopraxiscope; and Animal Locomotion.
Among the objects received was his 'Zoopraxiscope', which, spinning specially-made glass discs of his photo sequences, is one of the earliest known machines able to project moving images.
Research and report about other scientific animation toys such as the thaumatrope, kineograph, mutoscope, praxinoscope, or zoopraxiscope.