zoot suit

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zoot suit

 (zo͞ot)
n. Slang
A man's suit popular during the early 1940s, characterized by wide-legged, tight-cuffed trousers and a long coat with wide lapels and heavily padded, wide shoulders.

[Probably from an alteration of suit.]

zoot′-suit′er (-so͞o′tər) n.

zoot suit

(zuːt)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) slang a man's suit consisting of baggy trousers with very tapered bottoms and a long jacket with wide padded shoulders, popular esp in the US in the 1940s
[C20: of uncertain origin; perhaps an arbitrary rhyme on suit]
ˈzoot-ˌsuiter n

zoot′ suit`

(zut)
n.
a man's suit with baggy, tight-cuffed trousers and an oversized jacket with broad padded shoulders and wide lapels.
[1940–45, Amer.; rhyming compound based on suit]

zoot suit

A type of men’s suit with wide, tapering pants and a long, wide-shouldered coat that was fashionable in the 1940s.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.zoot suit - a flashy suit of extreme cutzoot suit - a flashy suit of extreme cut  
suit, suit of clothes - a set of garments (usually including a jacket and trousers or skirt) for outerwear all of the same fabric and color; "they buried him in his best suit"
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 1943, Fats Waller made a short film in which he sang his hit "Your Feet's Too Big" and made fun of a zoot-suiter in comically large shoes.
As a teenager myself, years later, I remember my father referring to my dress as akin to a 'zoot-suiter.' 'A what?' I wondered then.
There was some conflict over a girl, as one was supposed to go with a sailor but ended up with a zoot-suiter. The sailors descended on the zoot-suiters.
At a time when almost everybody wrote social-realistic fairy tales, I concocted a story about a zoot-suiter who, at a Sunday matinee dance, tries to do a jitterbug, is led off the dancing floor for "eccentric dancing," and when he protests the treatment which, he says, insults human dignity, the cop makes him show his identity card, takes down his name and address, and throws him out of the premises.
In early literary representations of the figures of the "pocho" (the Mexican trying to be Anglo-American) and the "pachuco" (the urban zoot-suiter), he contends, one can see Chicano groups repeatedly ridiculed and attacked for their lack of conformity to Mexican or Anglo-American patterns of conduct; but in the work of the noted Chicano Movement figures Luis Valdez, Jose Montoya, and Rolando Hinojosa, "pochismo" and "pachucismo" (representing, respectively, the historically significant Chicano experiences of cultural assimilation to Anglo-American ways and adaptation to an American urban environment) can be said to have been transformed into positive, even heroic, identity traits, reflecting "a number of significant Chicano virtues .
Paz's depiction of the deracinated zoot-suiter as "sheer negative impulse" no longer holds, as California Chicano and Tex-Mex culture have gained respectability.