zootherapy

zootherapy

(ˌzəʊəˈθɛrəpɪ)
n
1. (Medicine) med the use of therapeutic drugs derived from animals
2. (Psychology) psychol a type of therapy that uses animals
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In European and American scientific literature, the educational relationship concerning animals has been predominantly studied through zootherapy or animal-assisted therapy (AAT), which has experienced an increasing development over the last 20 years and has seen the promotion of the therapeutic side of this relationship.
In Europe, especially in francophone and Southern European countries, the term used is zootherapy.
Occasionally, zootherapy specialises in a very specific therapeutic aspect such as occupational therapy with dogs, which is widely developed in the US and Argentina, where the Asociacion Argentina de Terapias Asistidas con Perros defines it as a therapeutic approach in which a dog is used as a co-therapist or link between the patient and the therapist.
Treatment of jaundice included both phytotherapy and zootherapy, for the liver of the common Indian toad was used with fruits of the plant Musa paradisiaca for treatment.
Keywords: Thalassotherapy, Dolphintherapy, Down Syndrom, Animal Assisted Therapy, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Psychomotor Retardation, Cerebral Palsy, Zootherapy
A case of zootherapy with the tarantula Brachypelma vagans Ausserer, 1875 in traditional medicine of the Chol Mayan ethnic group in Mexico.
Zootherapy is the use of animal or animal-derived metabolic products (like animal feces, urine) for the healing of animal and diseases of domesticated animal.
Turtle shells or other parts have been reported to be used in zootherapy in other parts of the world.