zygote

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zy·gote

 (zī′gōt′)
n.
1. The cell formed by the union of two gametes, especially a fertilized ovum before cleavage.
2. The organism that develops from a zygote.

[From Greek zugōtos, yoked, from zugoun, to yoke; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.]

zy·got′ic (-gŏt′ĭk) adj.
zy·got′i·cal·ly adv.

zygote

(ˈzaɪɡəʊt; ˈzɪɡ-)
n
1. (Biology) the cell resulting from the union of an ovum and a spermatozoon
2. (Biology) the organism that develops from such a cell
[C19: from Greek zugōtos yoked, from zugoun to yoke]
zygotic adj
zyˈgotically adv

zy•gote

(ˈzaɪ goʊt, ˈzɪg oʊt)

n.
the cell produced by the union of two gametes, before it undergoes cleavage.
[1885–90; < Greek zygōtós yoked, v. adj. of zygoûn to yoke, join together, derivative of zygón yoke]
zy•got•ic (zaɪˈgɒt ɪk, zɪ-) adj.
zy•got′i•cal•ly, adv.

zy·gote

(zī′gōt′)
The cell formed by the union of the nuclei of two reproductive cells (called gametes), especially a fertilized egg cell.

zygote

1. A fertilized egg cell produced during sexual reproduction.
2. A fertilized egg, formed by the union of a sperm with an ovum.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.zygote - (genetics) the diploid cell resulting from the union of a haploid spermatozoon and ovum (including the organism that develops from that cell)
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
cell - (biology) the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms; they may exist as independent units of life (as in monads) or may form colonies or tissues as in higher plants and animals
heterozygote - (genetics) an organism having two different alleles of a particular gene and so giving rise to varying offspring
homozygote - (genetics) an organism having two identical alleles of a particular gene and so breeding true for the particular characteristic
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
Translations
tsygootti
zigota
zigóta

zygote

n (Biol) → Zygote f

zy·gote

n. cigoto, óvulo fertilizado, célula fecundada por la unión de dos gametos.

zygote

n cigoto
References in periodicals archive ?
However, some embryos may develop from abnormally fertilized zygotes like tripronuclear zygotes (3PN).
In science: an individual organism whose body contains cell populations derived from different zygotes, of the same or different species.
After IVF, the putative zygotes were washed three times in Hepes-buffered TCM-199 and vortexed for 5 min to remove cumulus cells layer.
From fertilization to metaphase of the first meiosis, the actin layer was equally distributed over the cortex of zygotes. At late anaphase, the actin distribution at the polar body sites became very sparse and an actin-poor circular region was recognized at the animal pole.
Successful applications of ssODN have been demonstrated in various animal models through direct injection of CRISPR/Cas9 components into zygotes [28-30] or in human ESCs and iPSC for modeling human diseases [31-33].
The research team could not obtain human zygotes with this mutation on both copies of the genome (a rare homozygous genotype).
BERKELEY, Calif., January 13, 2017 -- Researchers here have found a way to reprogram mouse embryonic stem cells so that they exhibit developmental characteristics resembling those of fertilized eggs, or zygotes.
High levels of ROS represent a major contributing factor in vitro to developmental blockage in zygotes [6].
The obvious answer to curtailing unwanted and unnamed zygotes includes access to health care through family planning clinics, access to birth control and sex education.
However, as discussed by Matthew Porteus of Stanford and Christina Dann of Indiana University in the June 2015 issue of Molecular Therapy, several technical obstacles may preclude successful zygote injection in humans, including the fact that "only a fraction of injected zygotes give rise to viable offspring.
In mouse embryos, the gene is active in zygotes; its RNA then dips in abundance but rises again at the eight-cell stage.